August 21, 2018

After the success of my first opening talk and exhibition titled "Physical Absence" I am pleased to announce the second date has now been released.  

Abandoned Ni is a local photographer who documents abandoned properties around the island of Ireland. They are holding an exhibition at the Portadown Heritage centre with an opening night to include a presentation talk discussing a recently documented house where they found items dating back to the late 1800's to include letters, newspapers, coins, clothing and more! They will also have an installation piece on display along with a selection of images of the home. If you are a fan of social hidden history this is not to be missed!

Tickets on sale here, however be quick as this is expected to be another sell out!

https://billetto.co.uk/e/physical-absence-exhibition-opening-night-with-presentation-talk-tickets-304307

June 15, 2018

Abandoned Ni HQ Update: Exhibition "Physical Absence"

Sorry for the radio silence, I've been busy working on my next project, here's my update - I hope you can make it!

I was privileged to be asked to document a country cottage that was due to be demolished for a new build early this year. 
The first day we made the journey and opened the front door in early October 17' the cottage was cluttered with thousands of readers digest boxes stacked floor to ceiling. Even though it was messy we could see on shelves and in cupboards that the history in this country cottage was something to get VERY excited about! On that first visit we found WW1 binoculars, a newspaper dating from 1912 with the headline reading about the Titanic sinking. We also found Victorian era clothing in the wardrobe, war journals and bags of old coins dating from the 1800's.


We have since uncovered generations of history dating back to the late 1800's, remnants of the lives who lived here documented through letters, certif...

January 1, 2018

Happy new year to all my followers, I for one know this is going to be a very busy year!  I wanted to take the time to update you all with my latest project which has taken weeks of hard work but is going to be worth every effort.  I've been privileged to be asked to document a story and a half cottage that is due to be demolished for a new build early this year. 

The first day we made the journey and opened the front door in early October the house was cluttered with thousands of readers digest boxes stacked floor to ceiling.  Even though it was messy we could see on shelves and in cupboards that the history in this country cottage was something to get VERY excited about!  On that first visit we found WW1 binoculars, a newspaper dating from 1912 with the headline reading about the Titanic sinking.  We also found Victorian era clothing in the wardrobe, war journals and bags of old coins dating from the 1800's.

We have since uncovered generations of history dating back...

November 12, 2017

Northern Ireland has an abundance of derelict cottages, most have nothing in them but a number retain the personal objects and bits of furniture to give you a sense of who was there before.  This cottage didn't look like much from the road side, but once we were inside with the morning light breaking through the windows, our opinions were changed. 

A tea tin (with leaves still present) and tea pot waiting for a brew.

 This kitchen looked like it had been the heart of the home.

 Nature is breaking through and reclaiming everything in it's path.

 Sheets of wallpaper peel off the wall to show the textures of paint beneath.

 A book on Irish Poetry made out to "To my Dear Friend John with very best wishes, Bill" Dated 28.8.48

 A chair full of old and dirty cutlery.

 A bedroom dresser, the mirror looks as if it's been freshly cleaned.

 The cottage has only one bedroom, complete with bed and dresser.

 Some very old bottles from the chemist complete with contents, one bottle reads poison.

After ph...

October 29, 2017

People always ask, "have you ever had any paranormal experiences while urbex-ing?" The answer is yes, I've had a few things that I cannot explain.  Every building that I document has a different vibe, some good and some not so good.  I believe this is a testament to the people and experiences that occurred in the buildings in the past, good and some bad.  As Halloween is approaching I thought I would share some of these experiences, some I have spoken about before.

This glorious mansion was built towards the later end of the 1800's and has a rich and vibrant history.  When I win the lotto this will be the house I buy to restore, you're all invited to the house warming.  My love for abandoned photography was born in this house and in one of those many visits I experienced something I cannot explain.

At one stage I had my own keys to the property and I had come up to give a friend a tour.  We had walked the entire house from top to bottom and had been there maybe 30/40 mins, to t...

October 15, 2017

I briefly spoke about this house today at my lecture at the National Trust which was part of their Conversation Festival.  I highly recommend you visit next year if you haven't been.

This house brought together so many elements I love with abandoned photography - lots of peeling paint and brightly coloured walls along with religious pictures and statues.

I've was told upon visiting the house that was built in the 1940's and it has been abandoned from 1986.

 The holy water bottle was empty.

I'm told a nurse came over from London to live with her sister who was a nun. Maybe these were the suitcases she used to travel.

 Peeling paint surrounds the stove.

 The stair lift lies silent.

 More religious symbols line the bedroom fireplace and chest of drawers.

 Every wall in the house had a cross, I'm glad I wasn't alone as I would have felt quite uneasy.

 A cross and prayer beads still hang on the bed frame.

I leave and make my way to the next house in another corner of rural Ireland.

Like these images?...

October 1, 2017

I was thrilled when I saw this house and I couldn't wait to get inside to see what was behind those walls.  The downstairs windows had all been upgraded to double glazing, with the 90th birthday cards it looks as though the last gentleman to live here was only living in the downstairs rooms possibly due to mobility.

Records suggest the house was built in the early 1900's and the man who lived here had since passed away in a nursing home in 2011 on his 93rd birthday leaving the house as it is today.  I was surprised to find a grandfather clock and a lovely singer sewing machine, two of my favourite finds!

One of the bedrooms, with the bed still made.

 A laundry return box which states you'll be chaged 15\- if not returned!

 Dress shirts inside the laundry box.

 An old radio and a tin of Andrews Liver salts.

 Clothes hanging in the corner wardrobe.

How Nell Scored.

 Lots of black mould in this downstairs bedroom.

The grandfather clock stopped at 4.53

The book of Life!

August 16, 2017

When I was young I remember my grandmother talking about a local haunting, one where the family was tormented by a poltergeist by throwing plates, knocking walls and even shaking the children out of their beds.  The family emigrated by boat and so did the haunting.  It sounded scary to me then, and it still does.  Needless to say I've always wanted to visit this house and recently I got the opportunity.  The rain was coming down in sheets but I was in the area and determined to go regardless.

Welcome to the Coneen Ghost House.  The haunting is reported to have taken place in 1913 where a widow named Bridget Murphy and her 7 children were plagued by this poltergeist.  The house is very remote and up until recently was surrounded by forest.   I would imagine the walkway up to the house then was very different to what it is now.

I approach the house and walk along what is left of the driveway. 

As I get closer I notice the front door is covered over by a cage, a...

August 11, 2017

It was an early start this Sunday morning.  It was one of those mornings where the rain was constant and the clouds were low.  The approach to this farm dwelling is up a long and twisty lane, the grass has grown up the middle showing obvious signs of no visitors.

I parked the car and got out and noticed how isolated the farm felt and sounded.

Upon opening the door I was instantly drawn to the radio on the side board.

 I could imagine this was often on for entertainment, news and company.  Note the Cadburys tin, no plastic here!

 I have been told that the stove was a recent addition to the house, previous to this there was a coal fire which covered the entire house contents in soot, even the cups & saucers! 

 Out to the hall and the telephone seat is still laid out as there has just been a number searched and dialled.

 Some old and interesting books, covered in dust and damp coming through the walls. 

Most locations have some little surprises, this one caught me off guard...

July 13, 2017

In early 19th Century Ireland, mental illness appeared to be rife, or was it?  Some reasons for being admitted to your local asylum were; 'Moral Causes, Physical Causes, Hereditary and Not Known'. Moral causes included 'poverty, reverse of fortune', 'grief, fear and anxiety', 'religious excitement', 'domestic quarrels', 'ill-treatment', 'pride', 'anger' and 'love, jealousy and seduction'.  If these were some of the conditions to gain entry, that would explain why they were over crowded. 

There were also adverse treatments that the patients had to suffer, one was known as the "Circulating Chair",  the patient was tied to the chair in a seated or lying position.  The chair would then be rotated at a high speed, sometimes up to 60 times a minute.  Witness reports described it as "obstinate and furious", the swing "generated a sufficiency of alarm to ensure obedience, in the melancholic it provoked a natural interest in the affairs of life. 

For people living in th...

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